Tag Archives: The Twilight Zone

Rod Serling Revisited

Rod Serling Twilight Zone

An article I wrote for Literary Kicks a few years ago:

It’s common among “Beat Generation” aficionados to scorn the popular media version of the Beats, especially the term “beatnik”, and the stereotypical goatee-sporting hipster. But to a youngster growing up in a small town, like me, sensing there was more out there than what they taught in middle school, even the cliche hints of downtown jazz and nightlife and hip lingo were welcome. I could tell right away that Rod Serling was cool, from the subdued bongo drums in the opening theme to his sly, out-of-this-world countenance. He almost seemed to wink knowingly when he shared his imagination and vision with me, the viewer.

I remember the episode about the trumpet player, down on his luck and questioning his very reason for living. In a kind of jazz version of It’s A Wonderful Life, the musician is hit by a car, killed, then finds himself hanging out with another, older, trumpet player whose chiseled features, goatee, and night club suit are a sharp contrast to the pudgy angel Clarence in the Frank Capra classic, though he is an angel, nonetheless. After giving the young musician a new lease on life, we learn the angel’s name as he makes his exit.

“I didn’t catch your name!”

“Just call me Gabe,” says the goateed veteran horn-blower. “Short for Gabriel.” He holds up his trumpet to illustrate his point. Gabriel is the trumpet blowing angel in the Bible. But this wasn’t my parents’ church, it was the concrete-neon jungle where the hipsters dwell and Doctor Sax blows jazz in a smoky bar room.

Serling created the Twilight Zone in 1959. He often battled with censors and sponsors to present themes and issues which he felt were important but which the sponsors feared were too controversial. He became known as “Television’s Angry Young Man.”

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