A Psychological Drama set in France: Stranger Days by Rachel Kendall

Stranger Days book cover My book review of Rachel Kendall’s Stranger Days is on Empty Mirror.

I’m happy to report that Rachel Kendall does an exceptional job of keeping her novel, Stranger Days, fresh, fun and riveting. Kendall doesn’t shy away from the usual intrigue and romance of Paris, but she does it so well, Stranger Days is a pleasure to read. The edgy plot, with its dose of psychological darkness, held my interest from beginning to end.

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Chamblin Bookmine, Part One of Seven

The following was written by the always interesting Tim Gilmore on his blog, Jax Psycho Geo.

Source: Chamblin Bookmine, Part One of Seven

But after what happened with Manson in His Own Words: The Shocking Confessions of “The Most Dangerous Man Alive,” I was too ashamed to go back.

Even years later, when I’d assumed enough time had passed, Ron would give me a deal on a stack of books for trade-in, standing behind the cash register, with his mussed white hair and thin steel-framed glasses, and he’d joke with Frank, “Uh oh, better look out, he’s doing it to us again.”

In the years in between, I missed the strange steep back staircase that ascended to the dark and cramped second floor, and I missed the incongruous juxtaposition of poetry and horror fiction up there in the dark. I remembered particular purchases, Rimbaud’s Illuminations and Baudelaire’s The Flowers of Evil on the poetry side, and the cheap 1970s Ballantine paperback of H.P. Lovecraft’s The Lurking Fear on the horror side.

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Emanations 5

Emanations 2 + 2 = 5

Carter Kaplan has announced that, “Emanations: 2 + 2 = 5 is now in the final stages of production,” saying:

Here is a glimpse of the cover art by Ruud Antonius, taken from his painting The Fourth Plinth  (oil on panel, 100 x 80 cm).
Mr. Antonius is a Dutch painter who lives in the United Kingdom.  He has a large following in Europe where in the world of fine art surrealism enjoys greater support than it does in Britain and the United States.  Please click HERE to visit Mr. Antonius’s web site.

Here is the tentative table of contents:

Tales

ROBERT MEADLEY
Meeting Dr. Malthusian
C.E. MATTHEWS
In the Spirit of Enterprise
MICHAEL BUTTERWORTH
Hey, Mr. Pressman
GENEVIÈVE LAVERGNE
That Needlework
GARETH JACKSON
Numad
TESSA B. DICK
Seasons
JEFFREY FALLA
The Sword and the Tiger
TANTRA BENSKO
Catnip Pinata
RUUD ANTONIUS
J. P. Holmes, Junior
PARAMITA DUTTA
The First Time
AZIZ MUSTAFA
I was Latching on the Moon
NEHA SINHA
The Old Lady and the Sea
PHILIP MURRAY-LAWSON
Good Deed Day
MARLEEN BARR
Bedbugwoman
D. HARLAN WILSON
Dithyrambia
ANDREW DARLINGTON
My Little Black Egg
ELKIE RICHES
Most Women do not Creep by Daylight
SUSHMA JOSHI
The Zia Motel
JIM MATTHEWS
An Interview with Archibald Mansions
BILL ECTRIC
Doctor Waxwing’s Hotel of Rooms
MICHAEL G. CHIVERS
The Squalling Terror
CARTER KAPLAN
Cold Echoes (part III)
HORACE JEFFERY HODGES
The Uncanny Story

Verse
(in progress)

Themes

MARIELLE RISSE
Becoming the Buddhist Queen Elizabeth
HOLLY BAUMGARTNER
Eastern Promise
VITASTA RAINA
Writing Un-writing: A Theory of Time

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Brooding Scholars and Malevolent Spectres

The Hawk and the Tree

 

The always-interesting Mark Valentine writing about Patrick Carleton at Wormwoodiana:

In a contribution to a mailing of the ghost story correspondence society The Everlasting Club (new members welcome), the eminent anthologist and scholar of the field Richard Dalby revealed his researches into the little-known author of a single Jamesian tale, ‘Dr Horder’s Room’. This was Patrick Carleton, whose story of the malevolent spectre of a Cambridge Master of College was published in the anthology Thrills (Philip Allan, 1935). As Richard noted, Carleton had also written novels for Allan, and so that must have been how he came to be included in the collection. But who was Patrick Carleton?

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Haining Waning?

                

Douglas A. Anderson maintains that this Werewolf
anthology (left) contains no story by Guy Endore (right)

Yet another bogus claim by anthologist Peter Haining, as investigated by Douglas A. Anderson on Wormwoodiana.

Anderson says, “I’ve written elsewhere of a few other instances of his outrageous frauds (for one, where he lifted one author’s story from an early Weird Tales and claimed it was by Dorothy Macardle and from an Irish magazine) . . . Now I’ve happened upon yet another example of Haining’s premeditated deceit. I’ve recently been looking closely into the writings of Guy Endore (1900-1970), author of The Werewolf of Paris (1933).