The Derrida Paradox

 

Jacques Derrida

Jacques Derrida

The writings of Jacques Derrida, and his strategy of deconstruction, have fascinated me for years, even though I’m not sure I completely understand all of it. Derrida’s deconstruction poked holes in a reality that we have all taken for granted. By “we” I mean Western philosophy from Plato on down. The clearest explanation I’ve found is on this site called Derrida the Movie, which says in part:

Plato was saying that there is such a thing as ideal forms. These things are real, regardless of how we express them . . . for example, the idea of a cat is going to remain pure and unchangeable . . . the problem here is that it relies on the logic created by the power of symbolism. In other words, the logic is only as good as your ability to communicate it through the symbols. Derrida destroyed the symbolism, or at the very least called into question. 

And elsewhere on the site we read:

Plato pretty much laid the groundwork of how Western people viewed reality, constructed it and, most importantly, expressed it in terms that everybody else within that same culture would understand . . . Derrida enters the scene and says that Plato is essentially just one reading of reality.

And:

Marxists and other social critics, understandably, were happy with what Derrida did because he called everything into question. It’s as if the whole Western philosophical and academic infrastructure was like the Emperor in the familiar tale of The Emperor’s New Clothes.

Now, here is a paradox: Western thought puts a high value on capitalism, but Marxists call capitalism into question. This website is promoting a film about Jacques Derrida, so it is important for them to be as clear and accessible as possible. To sell a film about Derrida, they have become the best teachers on a philosophy that points out flaws in the capitalist system!     

This is not to say that you must oppose capitalism to appreciate Derrida. I just thought it was an ironic twist.

I’ll be learning more about Derrida during my Fall semester graduate course in literary criticism at the University of North Florida, starting next week.

Go to Derrida the Movie Website

 

 

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